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4,959 thoughts on “Discussion”

  1. I just got an email that originated with Capt Tyler Harper that Captain Rudy Yap passed away on August 13. I do not have any details. He lived in Kaneohe, HI.

  2. Got a call from Larry today. He is taking a head count. How about we save him some work and everybody email or call him and let him know what’s what. He needs to confirm for the banquet and some other stuff. Really important and instead of him making dozens of calls, each could make their own call or email.

    How does that go “Many hands make a heavy load light” or something like that.

  3. Today is the final day to get the reduced rates at the motel for the reunion. So far we have 45 rooms reserved for the reunion. My contact at the hotel say they are willing to extend the date for the better rates.

    1. Larry,

      I also do not know the procedure to update my current mailing address. We sold our home to our son and moved into a condo. NEW ADDRESS:
      2036 Palmerton Ct. NE
      Grand Rapids, MI 49505

  4. I got a list of reserved rooms for guys attending the reunion. So far, there are 36 rooms reserved! The deadline to get our special rate is August 8, so if you are planning on attending you need to make reservations soon.

  5. larry–wow–nice of Nerone–he must be up in the years.
    have had recent contacts with Fred Mayorga-his mother–age 92–feeling her age.
    any 1 else had recent skin cancer operations? the slow type.me and Al Taylor have.No big deal–so far–beats a day in the bush.

  6. I finally got Russel Wright’s email address updated on the roster section of this web site. The roster section of this web site is password protected for everyone’s protection. If any of you brothers need to get the password, all you have to do is contact me and I will get you the password.

  7. I had a nce experience at VA the other day I thought I would share. I went to the VA to get an appointment to get new glasses. I went up to the window and asked for an appt. After the usual info exchange the young lady asked when I wanted it. I said sometime soon! She replied “how about now?” I was in and had my glasses ordered in short order. I guess they had a cancellation for 10:00 and I was there at 9:55.

  8. I had been hiding in the hills of Colorado for over a month. When I got home I had some contributions for a couple of things.

    I received a donation from Brother Bill Beckum that he said to spend the money as I see fit. There are web site and domain expenses as well as snail mail expenses to send reunion notices to those that do not have email accounts. Thank you Brother Bill!
    I will see you at the reunion.

    I also got a donation from Brother Si Nerone. Every year for the past several years he has sent me money to spend on refreshments at the reunion. This year he did the same. Thank you Brother Si and I hope your health allows you to attend the reunion.

    I also got a donation from Brother Jim Intravia. He wants to use the money to help with the reunion and web site expenses. Thank you Brother Jim and I hope to see you at the reunion.

  9. I kind of fell out of the loop for a little while. I will get caught up with comments.

    Gil:

    I will reply to your email on your question of how to get in contact with Rex Allen.

  10. What a bragger! You young punks have no respect for your elders. All of you are nothing but young and going to hell in a handbag

  11. Fifty years ago today I arrived back in the world at Travis Air Force Base and then on to Oakland to say goodbye to the Army.
    This was in the middle of the exodus of the Fort Devens 196er’s from Vietnam.

  12. A FATHERS DAY REMINDER TO ALL YOU OLD-AND VERY OLD-FORMER GRUNTS–THAT CAN STILL TYPE AND READ-THIS SITE IS STILL HERE TO SAY–“HI ” TO US STILL ALIVE.

  13. Does anybody know the name of the little fire base the battalion built in Antenna Valley in December, 1970? I’ve always believed it was called Annette, but a discussion on another site indicates that might not be true.

    Charlie company was assigned the mission of securing the hilltop to build it, but we got lost and wandered around the mountains for 3 days until they took it away from us and gave the mission to Bravo company. They had no trouble finding the right hill. LOL

  14. Rick Lowell: Maybe it’s not too late to come. The hotel has been very, very supportive of us and might even let you book at the reduced rate. It’s the Basin Park Hotel in Eureka Springs, AR. You might just call them and ask. 855.700.9434 The dates are June 1-5.

    I don’t know why it was never listed here.

    1. Amen! Asked to give a 4 minute presentation at church on the small memorial I created in my front yard.

  15. I sent out emails about the reunion yesterday. We have 20 guys that have made reservations for the 2017 reunion in Cleveland. Captain Morris has a reservation and will attend this year.

          1. I wish I had known about that one. I would have attended. I didn’t see that in the Reunions tab.

  16. LARRY–ANY 1 -VETERAN–YOU KNOW THAT CAN COME TO REUNION TO TEACH SOME DUMB GRUNTS HOW TO TEXT ON AN INTERNET SITE–LIKE THIS 1 ?

  17. WOW LARRY–SOME SNOW FALL, BUT I HAVE AN IDEA–NEXT TIME 1 LIKE THIS IS COMING, GET YOUR PLATOON BUDDIES TO VISIT–AND HAVE THEM BRING SNOW SHOVELS. MAYBE REX COULD DO POINT.

  18. Larry, big end of April blizzard here. 2′ really wet snow but mostly gone now. Rancher friends 15 miles south got serious drifting, 6-10′ high. Must have been hard wind to drift wet snow that much. 2 outfits on horseback can’t even find 200 head replacement heifers.
    I hear it’s much worse down your way with 1000’s dead cattle. Are you all OK?

    1. Clay, we got around 26 inches of snow but had 50 mph winds. We had 6 to 10 foot drifts in front of the house. The trees had a lot of storm damages. Some of our cattle ranchers have lost up to one third of their herds. Some of their cattle walked with the wind and ended up more than 30 miles from here in Oklahoma. The roads got opened up for one way traffic and last night we got about an inch of rain that contributed to the misery. I do not have to be out in any of this but the poor soles out gathering their cattle have it really tough. We was out of electricity for 2 days. There are places that lost a lot of electric poles and they are telling them they will be without electricity for two to three weeks.

  19. I got home yesterday from my trip with Larry we had a great time visiting with fellow grunts. When we were in New Orleans we went to the WWII museum it was awesome if you ever get a chance to go don’t pass it up.

  20. On Wally’s and my second day on our trip, we saw Gary Able. He lives in Alabama. Gary was in 2nd platoon 3rd squad. He was in the squad that included Tate Hayes, Roger Sample, Glen Coonts, David Sweatman and was led by Bob Shepherd. We are the only guys he has seen since he left the field on a medivac. Gary hit a booby trap in March, 1970 and it took months to recover from his wounds and he got his medical discharge after his stay in the hospital. Gary was a carpenter most of his life after getting out of the Army. His nick name was “Big John”.

    1. Gary hit a booby trap made out of a mortar round. I kept the tail fin in hopes of giving it to him after I got out. The MP’s took it from me when I was leaving country. They did allow me to keep my SKS.

    2. Larry – I haven’t checked the Charliegrunts website in many months and the first post I see is about Gary Able. I was originally Tate’s squad RTO. By March I think I was Platoon RTO, but I was just a few yards away from Gary when he hit that tripwire. Charlie Company had stopped in the middle of a hump and was resting in place in some high grass. Gary, who was usually pretty low key, was clowning around. Some of us started laughing, and then Gary hit the tripwire. It was one of those Twilight Zone moments when everything went from funny to dark. If memory serves me correct there was at least another b.trap explosion a few minutes later that may have been set off, believe it or not, by a frog. Like I said, Twilight Zone time.
      Jim (Bravo Whiskey) Stoffers

  21. Wally Searight and I are making our annual spring trip to see brothers and just have fun. We flew into Tampa, FL Our first stop was to see Ron Hurst and his lovely wife Jan. They were sweethearts in the 7th grade, but it took them decades to get back together. Ron sure is tired of hearing about the story Short Round is spreading about him breaking his leg trying to start a Harley. They treated us to a great BBQ diner Smokies for lunch. He said they are looking forward to seeing everyone at the reunion in September. Captain Morris and Rocky Taylor called them when we was there. Captain Morris is looking forward to seeing everyone at the reunion.

  22. That I can’t answer. I signed up to be an artillery or armor officer but when I got to Fort Benning in Sept, 1968 they said we all were going to be Infantry. Our choice was that or 30 days leave & go to Vietnam as a PFC. Decided I would rather follow some one up the hill than lead. Plus discover if came back with less than 5 months could get an early out. Choose the latter & arrived in country on 11/5/68. Maybe demand was greater than demand. Have a great Easter to all my Grunts & Families.

  23. “The size of U.S. Units varied at different times during the period of the Vietnam War This is what I found on line:
    Squad: 10-12 men
    Platoon (3 x squads): 30-40 men
    Company (3 x platoons): 100-120 men
    Battalion: 3-4 rifle companies, an headquarters company and a combat support company, 800-900 men for US Army battalions, USMC were larger, around 1000-1100 men.
    Brigade (3 x battalions): 2500-3000 men
    Division: US Divisions in Vietnam were larger than in WW2 and had between 15,000 and 20,000 men.

    Units in Vietnam generally operated at 20% below official strength, often at 30%, or on occasion more, so essentially an average of 2 or 3 figures would be absent from any individual squad. Obviously it wasn’t spread out so evenly though, but effectively each platoon was essentially short of between 9 and 12 men at any one time – effectively one of its four squads.
    The ‘weapons squad’ was often used as a pool to replace ‘missing men’ (sickness, leave, casualties) and to provide each of the three rifle squads with an M60 (with one added from the battalion MG platoon). The recoilless rifles were rarely carried, so this also provided spare riflemen too.

    Squads of 5 men or less were considered ‘combat ineffective’ and 11 (including the Staff Sergeant leading the squad) was the maximum number of men it was felt could be led with any efficiency (the Marines obviously felt differently) by a single squad leader and even then, needed to be broken down into two ‘fire teams’ (ideally evenly), each led by a sergeant.

    Your Army squad would have a ‘Staff Sergeant’ leading it and up to two Sergeants (or men acting as such) as fire-team leaders. Two men will have an M79 each and one will almost certainly have an M60. The rest of the men have M16 rifles.”

    The above seems to fit my memory from 11/68-11/69. I remember our squad only had one M-79 and that was me & one M-60. Do not remember any LT as Platoon Leader, only Sergeants who where usually Staff Sergeants.

    1. Bill
      Early on (’66-’67) it was rare not to have a 1LT for every platoon.
      There were occasions when an E7 would fill in upon the loss of an officer.
      Your observation is even harder to understand when the output of Infantry officers nearly quadrupled in 1966, with more companies and a shorter cycle.
      I wonder what happened.

  24. I seem to remember , i think it was around Nov. of 69 that we went to the field wit about 140 and two-three weeks later were down to about 75. Something like 30 wounded and several killed (i’m thinking it included Lt. Smith killed, Marty wounded badly, etc.) Lots of booby trap casualties as I recall and a bunch of sickness, probably dissentery. We got brought in about a week or two early because of it. All 48 years ago butI’m pretty certain of it.

    I think on paper an infantry company was supposed to be about 200, including hq platoon.

  25. Guys, if I remember correctly, we were always less than 100 .At one point during the monsoons, my squad had 6 guys in it .Tooch

    1. I seem to recall the company having about 90 to 100 men. Three platoons of around 30 men and three squads in each platoon.

    1. Clay,
      Nov, 68-Nov,69. Maybe some of the other guys may have an answer. It seem like we were always under strength.

  26. On the topic of the company roster, i remember seeing some which showed many more people than were around for operations. I also remember a time or two when out of the blue our platoon (3rd) would have a number of new guys show up at reveille. I can’t remember if these were before operations that were supposed to be in bad places or when our numbers were getting low. I do remember they didn’t look like they were new in country and they did look like problem children. I wondered if they were C Co guys who had been put on permanent shit-burning detail in Chu Lai because they were more trouble in the field than they were worth. Seldom saw them again after that initial reveille.

  27. RE: Weapons Co. In WWII, Korea and early VN D Co. was weapons co. They had machine guns and heavy mortars and attached them to line companies or maintained control of them depending on circumstances. In VN the line companies obviously needed their own MG’s and the Army had done away with 60mm mortars for 81’s which they intended to move by vehicles. So they did away with weapons co., made D Co a line co. and created E Co. to give battalion control of all mortars and make a home for the recon platoon. I’m told the 81mm mortars were attached to the line companies part of the time on the DMZ in early 1971. Some of those hills and ridges were near heart attacks for the base plate and tube humpers.

  28. Happy birthday LT Ruesch!
    Short Round: That 188 count came about by the roster having 141 guys on the roster which included 2 arty guys, 5 medics and 2 Kit Carson scouts. Then there were two rosters that had additions to the company after November 1. There were several November 1970 and several early December 1970 DEROS dates on the roster.

    What was strange was that there was 2 E-2’s that had a DEROS date of November, 1970. These two guys must have been in trouble or something.

  29. LARRY—CHECK AGAIN–I THINK LOCO GOT TO US AROUND APRIL OF 70. I WAS GONE BY OCT. OF 70
    YAHOO WANTS ME TO ANSWER TOO MANY QUESTIONS.
    WE HAD 188 GRUNTS IN C. COMPANY–WOW AND WOW–SOME 1 HAD TO PAD THAT COUNT. FOR SURE NEVER 188 OUT IN THE BUSH WHEN WE WERE THERE.

  30. Jeez. I remember Warlock more than I remember people.He was great and I feel like crap about what happened to him..

  31. Look forward to it. Remember him well. Never walked directly behind you but remember being three or four back. Remember keeping my eyes on Warlock & not you. Knew he would be the first to be alerted. Beautiful animal. I can’t believe a handler would be that stupid. What a shame for Warlock to go out that way. Lord willing, see you in Cleveland.

  32. Then I believe it was you. It is indeed a small world. Are you coming to Cleveland? Was Warlock grey & black German Shepherd?

    1. Bill:

      Warlock was Black & Grey/White. I was pull out of the field Feb 1970 & went home in March. Yes I am going to Cleveland.
      Another handler name Tommy got Warlock after I went home managed to kill him (had to be put down) because he didn’t have enough water. He was a dope smoking, drug user idiot from Pittsburg PA. I ran into him at the “Wall”on Veterans Day and my wife had to cool me off because I was going rip his head-off.
      See you in Cleveland!

  33. Larry, I think it was March of 70……….we (1st Plt) hit some bad stuff; got 3 replacements…….. our Latin Connection, Loco, Chuy and Stache…….. and we became invincible.

  34. LARRY–I REMEMBER LOCO FROM 1ST PLATOON. I TRIED TO EMAIL HIM AT YAHOO–BUT TOO MUCH SIGN UP NONSENSE.
    REMEMBER LT DORMAN ALSO–HE WAS TO GET C. COMPANY WHEN LT TY LEFT IN AUGUST OR SEPT. 70

    1. SR: I do not know what you are talking about when you say too much signup nonsense to send Loco an email. He and I email each other and I have never have had a problem and have no Yahoo deals that I signed up for.
      Loco has seven children and a year ago he had 15 Grandchildren and 1 Great grandchild. He put in over 24 years active and reserve time. He got to Nam in October 1970.
      I am not sure when John Dorman took over as the company commander. I have a field roster dated November 1, 1970 and it shows John as a first LT. Looking at that roster was something. They had a lot of non-commissioned officers and a lot of older guys on the list. The company at the first of November had 3 E-7’s, 11 E-6’s and 22 E-5’s. There were 188 guys on this list which included all the medics and other support guys.

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